3D, VR, 360° and Street View Photographers  |  Real Estate Agents  |  3rd Party Service Providers
Should I buy a Camera? Quiz How Much to Start 3D Tour Business? Calculate How Much Can I Make as a Pro? Calculate Win More Listings? Calculate
We Get Around Network Forum
WGAN Training Academy (Learn more)
WGAN-TV Channel
Panoskin to Google Street View Demo and Discuss
for Newbies with Wojciech and Tom with Panoskin
Virtual RealityVR

How will you position VR?2774

Basic
Member
htimsabbub23 private msg quote post Address this user
Now that's the cats out of the bag and we all know VR is coming, how will you position it and what uses do you see for it. . Usually I can think out of the box, but I'm really tired this. Morning...... Off to get more coffee!
Post 1 • IP   flag post
franmts private msg quote post Address this user
If I could make a wish is to all Matterpeeps to sell it as something MORE, for little more cost, not just something included in the basic package. Let's increase revenue.
Post 2 • IP   flag post
Basic
Member
htimsabbub23 private msg quote post Address this user
All day of thinking how this really benefits the real estate market and not one good solution. VR has not become mainstream enough in my opinion.

Don't get me wrong, I love that matterport is way ahead of the curve, but how many of home buyers own vr? How many of you did before getting into matterport?

Please help me position this in a way my realtor clients will love me.
Post 3 • IP   flag post
UserName private msg quote post Address this user
That raises a good question; who owns VR headsets? I imagine that a lot of technology buffs do.

My other question is; who is the target market for Matterport VR? Average people or realtors? If realtors could be convinced that they could make more money with VR maybe realtors would be the target market right now.

On some HGTV shows a realtor show a couple several homes. If realtors used VR, maybe they could show 10 homes in the time it normally takes to drive to one. A potential home-buyer could view many homes virtually before deciding on the ones he/she would like to visit.

I don't know how real realtors work, so I don't know how often they interact with clients. However, if a realtor did have lots of people needing to see homes, maybe that realtor could make more money by demoing lots of homes quickly via VR headsets. I could see an HGTV realtor showing a couple lots of homes while they're all still at one home -- or in the realtor's office.

I'm also sure there's a reason why a Matterport can't scan a home for free and collect when a realtor sells the home. Maybe a major marketing campaign should target realtors who'd like to obliterate their competitors and fill their bank accounts with cash -- assuming Matterport could make all that happen.

My final question is "Why Matteport?" Why not "Joe's VR Home Tours?" The new CoreVR tours are great, but since they're simple linked 360 photographs with no transitions, Joe at "Joe's VR Home Tours" may wonder why folks would choose Matterport over him. From what I've seen of CoreVR, lots of waypoints exist. But Joe could probably create those too with his Home Tour Creator software. CoreVR tours don't have dollhouses or 2D floorplans, so Joe doesn't need those either.

The question becomes "Why not Joe?" How can Matterport differentiate it's CoreVR tours from others on the market?

Here's what I might like if I was a realtor working with a Matterport pro. I'd like the ability to control what my client sees. If the client is left to roam freely, he/she may never see the major selling points of a home I, as the realtor, want the client to see. If I the realtor, while viewing a laptop -- could see what the client sees in his/her headset, I could be a virtual tour guide who takes the client on a tour of my choice. The client, at any time, would always be free to look around and even explore a bit before I regained control of the tour.

I viewed a CoreVR model yesterday. But, I roamed around randomly and stumbled upon some very nice features. Imagine that model being 10 times bigger -- like a mansion. Now imagine a realtor, viewing a laptop, guiding me, with a VR headset on, to points of interest in a home the realtor thinks I'll love. To me, it becomes like a magic movie that I can interact with whenever I like. The Hololens allows wearers to snap photos and shoot videos of what they see.

Imagine a realtor allowing a client to snap photos, take videos while visiting a home in VR. The client would get to keep those photos/videos and review them later.

Good luck with the VR portion of the business. As we've seen in videos, people wearing VR headsets are often amazed. Ideally there's a way to make money with VR tours regardless of the size of the VR market
Post 4 • IP   flag post
Basic
Member
frstbubble private msg quote post Address this user
@UserName why not Joes VR because it is a lot more time intensive. MP builds the tour and points for you. I like the idea of interactive via the laptop to guide. Disable more points to more to only the highlight points (could be a dedicated VR tour/duplicate).

How about getting away from real estate and doing points of interest and advertising for landmarks, scenic sites, museums, auctions, and the list goes on. There are others on here that are already doing it. Like what @Tosolini did at the museum of flights!

Get out of the realtor box!!!

Now if only I had some leads other than realtors.

Hope this help spark some thinking outside the box.
Post 5 • IP   flag post
Basic
Member
frstbubble private msg quote post Address this user
And just wait for Amazon VR! Or my favorite place B&H photo VR!!!

Wait I didn't say or suggest that. That would mean the wife wouldn't leave the house to go shopping just put on the headset and continue to mumble at me.
Post 6 • IP   flag post
UserName private msg quote post Address this user
Transported VR, now in beta testing, seems to put a lot of focus on the realtor. Here's what they said in a newspaper article,

"The most ideal way to use virtual technology is to think of it as a way to eliminate potential properties. Transported’s software is made for the buyer’s real estate agent, who would need a VR headset set up in their office. "You can go through 20 homes in an hour in your agent’s office."

Transported VR doesn't go into details, but from their graphics, they might create VR tours from media people upload. The tours don't appear to be models but videos and panos that have waypoints, descriptive tags and other marketing tools built in. Transported VR tells realtors (regarding deciding whether to use VR or not), "Disrupt or be disrupted."



They say you can upoload VR media and in 10 minutes create tours that work on Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Google Daydream, Sony Playstation, Samsung Gear, and the web.

Transported VR also has logins for realtors and talks about realtors holding showcases where many home buyers view VR homes in a realtor's office.

I'm still waiting for my beta invitation to see what's going on there. I guess if you get enough realtors on-board, you can get a lot of Matterport business scanning properties for them essentially doing what Transport VR is doing; targeting realtors.

Transported VR seems to be offering a single portal where realtors can 1, manage their VR tours and 2, give virtual home tours to people who come to a realtor's office. Maybe the software also makes it easy for a realtor to guide a home buyer through a precise presentation that enables the buyer to tour many properties quickly to narrow down the field.

Transported VR home page
Post 7 • IP   flag post
42241 7 7
destitute